Taking Part

Natsal is an important study that helps those working in health care to build up a picture of life in Britain and how it’s changing. It allows them to make better decisions about public health policy, practice and research.

Natsal has taken place every 10 years since 1990 and is one of the largest studies of its kind in the world. So far, 45,000 people have taken part in Natsal.

Have you been invited to take part in the National Study of Health and Relationships (Natsal) 2021?

To collect data that are representative of the British general population, Natsal uses the Postcode Address File as its sampling framework. This is where postcodes, then households, are selected at random. An interviewer from NatCen Social Research then calls at the selected household and randomly selects just one person aged 16-59 to invite to take part.

Our study partners NatCen have a list of FAQs here and other information about taking part in the study.

If you are invited to take part it’s easy to say no, but we really hope you don't as it's important that as many people take part as possible - regardless of their experience - as this means our data are more reliable. We know your time is precious, but our work really does make a difference and the results from previous Natsal surveys have been used by doctors, policy makers and scientists for over 25 years. For example the first Natsal survey, in 1990, helped us to understand the spread of HIV in Britain and how best to stop it spreading further. More recently, the findings have helped plan health services like the National Chlamydia Screening Programme and the HPV vaccination programme. The results are also used to inform health education programmes, such sex and relationship education in schools, so they are evidence-based.

I've not been invited to take part in the study, can I still be involved?

To collect data that are representative of the British general population, Natsal uses the Postcode Address File as its sampling framework. This is where postcodes, then households, are selected at random. An interviewer from NatCen Social Research then calls at the selected household and invites one person in the eligible age-range to take part. For Natsal-4, that’s people aged between 16-59.  

Whilst you can't just sign up to take part in Natsal, there are other ways to engage with the study. For example, as part of the development work for Natsal-4 we held an open consultation so people from all walks of life could have their say on the questions that the Natsal-4 survey should ask. You can read the report here.

Follow us on twitter @NatsalStudy for more information about engaging with the study. 

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